Good Morning TV, 12th Sept 2011 interview

September 9th, 2011 § 2 comments - add yours

Rob Suisted was interviewed again by Sarah Bradley on Good Morning TVNZ, yesterday morning.

Click to view

Click to view the interview

Rob Suisted's new book titles due any day - New Zealand Birds book, and National Parks BookHe was talking about his 8th & 9th books just released.  Let us know how you think the interview went.  All the best.

2012 calendar season showcasing Rob’s work

September 2nd, 2011 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

That time of year when our calendar publishers unveil there collections.  Here are a few dedicated Rob Suisted titles and covers you’ll see in all great stores around New Zealand:

2012-rob-suisted-calendars_t

This year would be one of the best looking line ups of retail products we’ve done.  Rob is very happy with the quality - they look really good. The New Zealand Panorama title is especially delicious - full of his heartfelt favourite panorama images.

Dominion Post interview with Rob Suisted

August 29th, 2011 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Cameron Williamson, travel editor of the DomPost, kindly did this interview about Rob Suisted and his 9th new book release

Click here to read the PDF of the interview with Rob

Click above to read the PDF of the interview with Rob

Free casual photo walk then breakfast with Rob Suisted. Wellington, 10th Sept

August 18th, 2011 § 2 comments - add yours

Rob Suisted has photo guided from Pole to Pole, and a few places in between.  He’s never done it locally. 

He’s offering a casual, free, photo walk on the Wellington south coast on the morning of Saturday 10th Sept, followed by a group breakfast.

It’s great meeting new people, and sharing creative inspiration and knowledge. Coming into spring is a great time to get motivated!  Click here to read about it

It’s limited in numbers, so register your interest now. Pass it on.

Wellingtons wild south coast

Wellington's wild south coast

Rob Suisted photo guiding, Greenland, Arctic. Join us in Wellington

Rob Suisted photo guiding, Greenland, Arctic. Join us in Wellington

New books and a great photo competition

August 17th, 2011 § 5 comments - add yours

Just got advance copies of my eigth and ninth books arrive.  Smaller softcover titles this time.  Especially like the Mount Ngauruhoe cover; Beaut. You should see these in shops in the next week or two.

Rob Suisted's new book titles due any day - New Zealand Birds book, and National Parks Book

Rob Suisted's new book titles due any day - Birds of New Zealand book, and National Parks of New Zealand Book. New Holland Publishers.

Also - I’m judging the NZ Geographic Magazine Photographer of the Year awards again in 2011.  Make sure you get your entries in by 14 September 2011 here

Of human bloodshed and fascinating photo jobs

August 3rd, 2011 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

I love most the unexpected nature of photography.

Yesterday Garry Glynn contacted me to photograph a family heirloom piece. Other photographers he’d contacted weren’t interested; I assume it being a small paying private job. I had a hunch that there was something more interesting about it, took it on, and luckily I was proved right.

89 year old Garry arrived and delivered to my hand a small simple heavy brass drinking cup similar to many I’d used in India. Nothing special except it had engraving around the outside. It carried a story that I’m still thinking about today; a story of history and horrific human bloodshed.

From the Battle of Mahajapore. Scroll down for result

From the Battle of Mahajapore. Scroll down for result

Turns out Garry’s relative (Col Sgt J. Barry, 39th Dorestshire Regiment) was present at the Battle of Maharajpore, India, on the 29th December 1843. He was lucky to make it. 5000 people did not make it that day! In a nutshell, Central and Northern India had fallen to British forces in 1818, but Marathas in Gwalior saw the failed British campaign in Afghanistan as opportunity to regain independence. The battle ensued. It’s believed that nearly 800 Bristish soldiers and 3-4000 Marathans were killed; an unbelievable slaughter of human beings in one day. The significance of this event for the British is remembered with the Gwalior Star campaign medal.

Garry is passing this family ‘war trophy’ or heirloom down to the next generation and wanted a photo showing all the cup’s text to give to his relatives. My job was to attempt that. Given the circular object with concave face, and the highly reflective nature of the surface, the job wasn’t straightforward. But I love a challenge, and I reckon it could be done.

First up was to prepare the vessel. A good polish brought out a good shine, and a closely held candle flame sooted the surface up nicely, and another shine left a little soot in the engraving. Next was figuring out how to light the face of the vessel with even light. No problems there, get an Elinchrom studio light out and pop on a softbox, but trouble is that you can’t get a camera in there without interrupting the clean lighting. I tried a couple of tilt shift lenses attempting to shoot off the central axis, but this just distorted too much. Then I figured the concave front face would let me lower the softbox and shoot over the top without breaking the clean reflection - great.

Camera shooting over studio flash and softbox

Camera shooting over studio flash and softbox

Once a nice even light was sorted, next was to carefully rotate the vessel and photograph ovelapping images. Another lens base proved to be the perfect stage.

Photo slices ready to be worked up

Photo slices ready to be worked up

I ran this through a panorama stitching programme and gave it a clean up. Garry just called around today and seems very happy with the result:

The final result

The final result

But I’ve been thinking about the cup since: what horrors and good times it has witnessed, and what route it has taken to arrive in my hands? Garry tells me that a number of ‘retired’ seasoned British soldiers were offered land in New Zealand in exchange for being willing to fight in the NZ land wars if necessary. They become known as ‘The Fencibles’, and this is the route in which the cup arrived in NZ.

I also found this gritty, stiff upper lip, description of the battle by Henry Man. It’s a short honest read that gives you an appreciation of how gnastly that day must have been. Please take a moment to read it if you can.

So, all in all, a photo job that paid for itself in not only in dollar terms, but that was also rich in knowledge, experience, and technical challenge.

The things you see when you don’t have a (net) gun

June 30th, 2011 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

We get lots of interesting image requests.

Today we had one for birds spreading their wings. Hoping the designer knows their subject….or there might be more than Kiwis flying….flying-kiwi-rob-suisted_w

Small seedlings made my day with flower photos

April 15th, 2011 § 1 comment - add yours

My day was brightened with an email from room 12 of Marina View school in Auckland.  They wrote explaining they were studying artists, and this week for photography were using my photography as inspiration.  They sent me some of their work, and today proudly gave me permission to share some of their photos. 

The pupils are year 3, which means in NZ they’re 7 year olds.  I’m impressed.  Thanks Room 12, and thanks for recognising me. 

Photos from Marina School Room 12

 My favourite is the palm fronds because it has a really nice strong design, but I think you’ve all done very well.  Keep up the great efforts.  Who knows, I might just see you out and about photographing nature one day?

Thanks, Rob

A catch up, and thanks for the vote

March 25th, 2011 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Things have been really busy since returning from Antarctica; I’ve been a little remiss on updates amongst the exciting jobs.

I’m working on three new books at the moment.  One book is on a well known high country station which I’m really enjoying.  I had another visit last week and again met great people, great scenery and it was nice to photograph hard working people in dusty dry conditions; hard on photo gear, but good atmosphere.  Here’s an image that evokes one of the mornings with the stockmen.

I also had the pleasure of meeting the Bush’s of Bush’s Honey, Blenheim.  They’ve been beekeepers since 1916, and are very nice folks - I’ll be buying their honey from Moore Wilson’s from now on.  They put me in a bee suit to take some photos of working their hives.  They’ve developed their craft without the use of smoke to calm the bees, necessary in a very high fire hazard zone in the high country.  Fine for them, but I soon discovered that bees (when there are millions of angry ones) are experts at exploiting weaknesses.  If I put my camera too close to my eyes they could sting through the veil mesh, and after 2 hours their tally was 4 stings to my face.  No probs at the time, all part of this job.  But, a day later I was feeling very sorry for myself.  An extremely swollen face was testament to the poor lymphatic drainage abilities of our faces;  I was the elephant man incarnate and scaring small children and some adults.  I was unrecognisable!  I’d post a photo here, but seriously it’s not good for PR.  Thankfully the swelling has pretty much left now after a week, and I found out that if I was allergic to bees I wouldn’t be here to write this.  It was surprisingly extreme photography, very exciting with hundreds of bees smashing into the body aand face mesh, while trying to take photos. I now understand why the Bush’s take safety so seriously.  Thanks for the amazing experience guys - and the honey sandwiches!

Photographing the Bush's collecting honey. An extreme exercise in photography. Click for larger photo

Photographing the Bush boys collecting honey. An extreme exercise in photography. Click for larger photo

I’ve also been working up the Whanganui River, with a spot of walking, jetboating and canoeing with Bridge to Nowhere tours.  A great place somewhat off the beaten track, and some great images.  A highlight was calling into the old convent at Jerusalum near Pipiriki early one morning.  Such a peaceful place with sun forcing through the river fog on a windless morning, surrounded by trees groaning under the weight of ripening fruit.  A little paradise.

Some nice news this week.  My book Majestic New Zealand just won runner up in the Whitcoulls pictorial book of the year awards at the Travcom conference.  Simon Mcmanus (VP at Travcom) kindly let me know that the judges said it was very close to judge.  So, I’m proud about that, and grateful to Travcom and Whitcoulls.  The book is available signed via my website bookstore and here’s a short youtube clip of the book.  Sorry about the music, but I’m a photographer….

Commissioned photography, Rob Suisted, Wellington, New Zealand

February 28th, 2011 § 3 comments - add yours

Commissioned commercial photography is something I really enjoy.  It’s time to make a dedicated website for the commissioned side of my photography business.  I’ve been privileged to work with some top clients, on some truly challenging and great jobs around New Zealand over the years.  This new website showcases some of that work and touts for more.

Rob Suisted commercial photography, Wellington, New Zealand

Rob Suisted commercial photography, Wellington, New Zealand. Click the image for a visit.

I’ve worked across an immensely diverse suite of photographic projects: from remote aerial filmingAntarctica & the Arctic, editorial photographic work for magazines and books, portraits (corporate or candid), travel photography, working with animals and children, and even filmed emotions. 

Experience has taught that the only constant in photography is uncertainty (every job is unique and different)  and that drawing from a diverse range of experience and ‘tricks of the trade’ while adding in fresh ideas is the key to figuring out and excelling at the next photographic challenge.  I love it and will be doing more alongside my Nature’s Pic Images business.

I’d love to get your feedback on version 1.0, or hear any bright ideas you have to make it better.  Thanks.

Antarctica in one photo only

January 25th, 2011 § 6 comments - add yours

How do you sum up Antarctica with one photo?  Tough?  Impossible?

I’ve done over 15 expeditions to the Ross Sea, Adelie Coast and Antarctic Peninsula, but took my first photo last week that nearly captures the essence of Antarctica for me.  Here it is:

Crabeater seals in Antarctic iceberg graveyard. Booth Island

Crabeater seals in Antarctic iceberg graveyard. Booth Island

I had about 30 minutes to myself amongst an area of stranded icebergs.  The sky was heavy with no wind.  Magic starts to happen. I had to find it.  Slowly I weaved my zodiac boat amongst … > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

An inspiring woman and inspiring photo job

December 20th, 2010 § 2 comments - add yours

Bianca Edwards doesn’t do things by halves.  But her back was broken in halves.  Her story is as remarkable as her attitude.  Several weeks ago I shot the New Zealand Geographic Magazine article on ‘Happiness’.  Bianca was part of this story.  I enjoyed meeting her, and thoroughly enjoyed working together on an image that captured her remarkable spirit.  On the drive back to the office, my assistant Aliscia Young spoke about the inspiration we’d both experienced.   Let me tell you about it.

Bianca was a top athlete, competing in multi-sport events, and while training, was hit from behind by a van at 100km/h.  Her back was shattered and she was lucky to survive.  What followed is a remarkable recovery led by determination, optimism and, I think above all, the unwillingness to be a victim to her situation.  The article by Dave Hansford focuses on how Bianca was able to readjust her expectations; from expecting to win events, to making simple steps, like wiggling a toe.  A trait that some research suggests is key to being happy.

So, knowing this, how do you approach a photo shoot that gives dignity to the subject, captures their spirit, and avoids creating another cliched photo of a disabled person toiling against obstacles? 

Discussing angles on the phone with Bianca was a joy - full of ideas and keen to give it her best, we threw around ideas about the things that were important to her - fitness, swimming, study, Ducatis…  Motorcycle riding was key, especially with her friends and fellow Ducati owners Carla and Fiona (friends like this that Bianca rates in her recovery) .  Hang on….from not being able to walk, to riding big motorcycles?!  The angle fast became clear.  But, how to shoot a portrait that captured this story? 

Carla, Rob, Bianca & Fiona. The Ducati women of the Wairarapa.

After the shoot. Carla, Rob, Bianca & Fiona. The Ducati women of the Wairarapa.

Bianca’s story in the happiness article for me is one of ‘freedom’ - freedom of movement, but also freedom of mind.  So, it was important that we had a very dynamic image to portray freedom. We tried to accomplish this with an open face helmet, but the freedom died.  With considerable care we took this without the helmet.  I think we caught Bianca’s spirit in the image below. What do you think?

Bianca Edwards and her Ducati, with Fiona and Carla

Bianca Edwards and her Ducati, with Fiona and Carla

TECHNICAL SPECS: We pottered very slowing along with a 1/8th sec shutter with ND filter, while using my aerial photography gyro stabiliser to maintain sharpness but achieve a blurred movement.  I super-clamped and magic armed 3 strobes to the back of the vehicle, and shot from the rear hatch.  Canon 1dsMk3, 16-35mm, ND filter, 3 canon flashes, Kenro gyro.

The Spirit of the Horse; chasing Kaimanawa wild horses

December 16th, 2010 § 2 comments - add yours

I just had the opportunity to photograph some remarkable animals. Kaimanawa wild horses can polarise people. They made me think.

I was a professional conservation manager before I was a professional photographer. I am well aware of the issues with these introduced animals living in an environment of high conservation values, such as these horses. This issue touched me years ago as minute taker for one of the advisory meetings on mustering the horses back in the 1990’s when scientists and managers nutted out the operational plan to manage their numbers. I’ve also studied zoology, and animal behaviour is a huge interest area given my photography. I’ve never gone out of my way for horses, and really haven’t had much to do with them.

Young Kaimanawa wild horse stallion all fired up after challenging another horse

Young Kaimanawa wild horse stallion all fired up after challenging another horse. We've made a canvas print of this boy available below.

Why am I explaining you this? Well, my recent experience was a surprise. I discovered a spirited animal with interesting behavioural traits I hadn’t expected. The horse, domesticed by man over thousands of years, again returning to a wild state & rebuilding its wild traits. I discovered a huge difference between domesticated horses, and those that run free.

The word ‘broken in’ refers to spirit I feel. I saw colts and stallions galloping kilometres across open tussock to challenge each other, and then race back. I saw stallions protecting their herd, and a mare cautiously introducing her new foal to her herd. I saw piles of horse poo stacked high as a territory or social marking. But, beyond all I saw spirit. Of course, I’m in two minds - I’m into conservation, but I can also see the other side of the argument to retain some of these animals; to have a wild animal running free - for their spirit but also ours as humans. A quandary alright; one that touches on our conservation ethic, but also strums spirited chords deep within our psyche. Both have value.

I went to photograph horses. I found a lot more.

I’m pleased to make my favourite image from the day available as a high quality canvas print. He’s really fired up and full of himself, and the flowing mane and glare in his eyes says it all.

Thank you to Peter Cosgrove for his generous gift of time and hospitality to make this trip possible. What is your view about these animals?

Capturing Happiness

December 8th, 2010 § 1 comment - add yours

Just had a week shooting an article on ‘Happiness‘ for the Jan/Feb 2011 issue of New Zealand Geographic Magazine

A bit outside my normal beat, but despite initial trials and tribulations, it became a most satisfying and challenging week.  Meeting, filming and spending time with such a varied group of people interested in happiness, really made me happy.  Not surprising really - from a buddhist monk to a philosopher, brain researcher and even an athlete who has learnt to walk again and now shes rides ducatis for fun, it was very inspiring.  I hope my images do them all justice.  Rob Suisted filming at monastery for happiness articleHere’s a hint of what’s coming. And here’s another teaser from NZ Geographic http://twitpic.com/3bf5ed.  Have a look out when the next issue arrives, and let me know what you think. I’ll be writing more on this subject. All the best, Rob

www.RobSuistedonCanvas.co.nz launched

November 22nd, 2010 § 1 comment - add yours

We’re very pleased to annouce the launch of a quality canvas photo print range by Rob Suisted.  It’s been a huge task selecting prints we’d be proud to see on peoples’ walls.  

With Christmas shopping underway, we wanted to make these great gifts available as soon as possible.  We also hope that people will just enjoy browsing amongst beautiful images from around New Zealand. We’d love for you to  pay a visit and give as any feedback or improvements you feel warranted (we’ve had some great ones so far). Visit:  www.RobSuistedonCanvas.co.nz

AND, we’re giving away 3 free copies of Rob’s best book (Majestic New Zealand) before Xmas if you sign up for the very ocassional newsletter .

New homepage for www.RobSuistedonCanvas.co.nz

New homepage for www.RobSuistedonCanvas.co.nz

Check out a few of the prints available:  Pohutukawa Prints| Panorama Prints | Moody Prints | Wildlife | Antarctica | NZ Flowers | Kiwiana | Abstract | NZ scenic |

Over-cooking a good thing - the future of nature photography?

October 29th, 2010 § 9 comments - add yours

Recently I helped judge the New Zealand Geographic Magazine Photographer of the Year awards with Andris Apse, Arno Gasteiger & James Frankham. Some interesting things stood out, but one in particular really surprised.

I’d guess 50% of images submitted in the landscape / scenic section had overly heavy use of HDR (high dynamic range) or some other overworked tonal mapping technique. For me it’s becoming the ‘graduated tobacco coloured sunset filter’ of the 80’s; obviously fake, overblown and often used pointlessly. It knocked how I felt about current landscape photography for a number of reasons…

Nature blesses us with remarkable beauty. We should seek to be good enough to do her justice in a photo. Sure, it can be tough dealing with the light she gives us, but we should rise to the challenge and learn how to capture it with strong technique and novel ideas when you’re out in the field, and then maybe touch it up with a light hand back home on the computer. We learnt good field skills before digital was invented.

Now it seems many just bracket shots, run them through an HDR program, wiggle a few sliders and output a terribly… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

2010 Magazine Cover Awards. We’re a finalist so far

September 20th, 2010 § 3 comments - add yours

UPDATE 29 Oct: WE WON our section! …… We’ve become a finalist in the 2010 Magazine Cover awards! I worked with New Zealand Geographic Magazine to create a special image to showcase our threatened New Zealand Falcon.

New Zealand Geographic Magazine Cover this month

New Zealand Geographic Magazine cover finalist in 2010 awards

I’m very proud of the image and how NZ Geographic treated it. Obviously other people agree and of course, I’d love it to win the title. If you agree it would be great to get your vote here: http://www.themaggies.co.nz/vote-now/ (and there’s a $5 discount incentive on subscriptions). Fingers crossed.
maggies2010

Kiwi with big brains doing good stuff

August 9th, 2010 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Michael Kerrisk contacted us for a cover photo for his new book.  He’s very smart, and he’s a Kiwi doing good stuff in a far off land.  Naturally we thought it great to have iconic kiwi image gracing his book cover and pitched a fresh fern koru image.

Michael loved the idea, in terms of what the koru represented, the clean fresh NZ link, and the obvious fractals pattern association (you’ll need a big brain to understand that apparently).
So here it is - a NZ connection to a new book on Linux Programming.  Judging by the spine, she’s a tome and a half.

Congratulations Michael.  It was a pleasure to help add the finishing touches of the New Zealand connection.

Linux book cover, photo by Rob Suisted

Michael Kerrisk's Linux book. Cover photo by Rob Suisted

Want to see more stock photos of New Zealand fern korus?

A big thank you to some little kids with big ideas

August 3rd, 2010 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

A couple of weeks back I spoke to Evan’s Bay Pre Shool.  Not my normal speaking audience, but it turned out to be a rich experience.  I got more than I bargined for.  The clincher was when Courtney said that “the kids often played at what you do for a job”.  It keeps giving; the kids just delivered me a thank you card. Thanks to you all; I now have it hanging in my office.

Thank you card from Evan's Bay Pre School

Thank you card from Evan's Bay pre school

Have a read about my visit here. It’s got a couple of cute photos and I wrote about why it was such a nice morning.

Rob talking to the kids

Rob talking to the kids

The kids ran their own photo competition and are proud of the results.  Here’s a nice comment.

Kids photo competition

Kids photo competition

NZ Geographic NZ Photographer of the Year judging 2010

August 2nd, 2010 § 2 comments - add yours

I’m judging the NZ Geographic Photographer of the Year Photo Competition, alongside Andris Apse and Arno Gasteiger. 

Entries are open now, there’s $6000 and a bit of fame up for grabs, and entry is free & online.   No excuses not to enter.  Closing date for entries 10pm, Tuesday 21st September, 2010.  Get into it.  Hopefully I’ll be viewing your work soon!  Good luck.

New Zealand calendar season starting already

July 26th, 2010 § 3 comments - add yours

It’s that time already - calendars for 2011 are starting to appear in shops. It seems earlier and earlier each year.

Every year we work with many publishers, designers, companies and printers to create a large range of quality calendars.  Retail calendar have just started hitting shops, and samples are arriving (it seems to get early each year).  Here are a few just in, with one that we particularly like below:

2011 calendars by Rob Suisted, a selection so far

2011 calendars by Rob Suisted, a selection so far

We particularly like the NZ Panorama title.  It was developed with John Sands based on the large collection of quality New Zealand panorama stock photos that Rob has created over the last few years. It’s a large calendar, and with metallic embossing on the front it looks great.
 2011 New Zealand Panorama calendar by Rob Suisted Have a closer look. These should be appearing in stores mid August.  2011 New Zealand Panorama calendar back by Rob Suisted

For your info, we have a massive collection of images perfect for NZ calendar production.  The calendars above are publically available in stores, but we also create numerous specific in house  titles directly with companies, such as banks, insurance companies, supermarkets, consultancies etc.  Please contact us if you have a calendar project in mind; they are a great full year promotional tool.

Into the Wild with Rob Suisted. Wilderness Magazine interview

July 8th, 2010 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

This just in from Wilderness Magazine.  Nice to be recognised by these folks.  Thank you.

Rob Suisted interview with Wilderness Magazine

Rob Suisted interview with Wilderness Magazine, click to read

Had a few covers of Wilderness to date:Wilderness Magazine covers by Rob Suisted

Are you giving something back? It’s the juice of life

June 23rd, 2010 § 5 comments - add yours

“The only way to divine happiness is by helping others” is a saying I heard years ago.

Last week I was asked to talk at a pre-school. My initial thought was that I didn’t have time to prepare and do it, and anyway, being used to speaking to adults, what would 3-4 year olds get out of it? 

Courtney from Evan’s Bay Preschool said, “these kids love playing at what you do for a job - they’d love you to visit”.  I remembered the saying above and reconsidered; and was very pleased I did.

eb01I took along my polar outfit and… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

South Pole and North Pole. Being bi-polar is a 50 year plan. Inspiration to me

June 1st, 2010 § 1 comment - add yours

I shared dinner with the first man to walk to the South Pole and the North Pole last week!  Robert Swan is a remarkable man in many ways. I want to share a bit about him, his 50 year project and what this meeting meant to me. I can’t believe my luck.

Robert Swan, South Pole

Robert Swan, South Pole

Robert Swan walked to the South Pole in 1986. At 33, he walked to the North Pole (1989). He’s earned a spot in history alongside the heroic explorers of old, becoming the first man to walk to both poles. Incredible. He doesn’t do things by halves, and he’s taken on some Herculean tasks since.

Robert Swan was in Wellington last week and I was invited to a small dinner.  Robert gave a pre-dinner slideshow that set the scene for an inspiring evening, and touched many chords for all of us. 

For me, having been to both polar regions, having some idea of how epic his walks were, and being a student of polar heroic history, it was a big treat sharing his tales, elbow to elbow, at the dinner table.

Robert Swan's final message to us

Robert Swan's final message to us

Robert was inspired by Antarctica and the heroic explorers when he was 11.  He dodged Oxford Uni (much to his father’s chagrin) and in his twenties decided to raise $5,000,000 for an expedition, bought a ship, convinced 25 volunteers to give up 3 years, and set sail to Antarctica, to walk to The Pole.  It took him 5 years to get 1000 sponsors and enough money, before setting sail in 1984 - meeting Capt. Scott’s last surviving expedition member Bill Burton in Lyttelton.  He tracked down original sponsors of Capt Robert Falcon Scott’s 1910-1913 expedition, e.g. Shell Oil supplied petrol to Captain Scott and again supported Robert’s attempt. It’s worth mentioning that Robert had never even been camping at this stage!

The short story is that he walked to the South Pole in 70 days without radios but, upon arrival, discovered that… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Circles within circles; serendipity is a good sign in this business

April 21st, 2010 § 5 comments - add yours

This month I gave a speech at the Photographic Society national conference.  I chose to talk about how photography can add to an exceptional life.

Partly I talked about how I’ve learnt that serendipity is a very important index to monitor in life and business.  True to form a nice bit of coincidence appeared while researching my speech.  It’s this that I want to tell you about, and why I’ve found it so vital to have.

Rob Suisted at Photo Soc. National Conf 2010
What is serendipity?  I know it’s fortuitous coincidence, but what is it really? And why do some people have more of it than others? I’m very interested.

My speech was titled: ‘Shooting from the Heart - seeking an exceptional life via photography’.  Of course, photography is my income, but it pays me richly in many better ways;  I’ve been lucky to meet some amazing people, wildlife, visit some special places, and share great experiences so far in my life.  The ‘juice of life’ is what I call it now, and it’s something that should ideally be enjoyed and sought in a pure sense, not driven by necessity or ego.

I’ve found that the more I try to discover this in a pure sense, without selfish interest, the more serendipity or coincidence appears.  It might sound a bit flaky or woolly perhaps, but I can assure you that there is a sensible reason for it, and here in lies what I have learnt so far, and wish to share.

Creative professionals know that creativity comes from an open still mind.  A mind that contains stress or fears becomes closed and creativity suffers.  Same with opportunity, same with serendipity.  I think that we all have similar portions of coincidence in our lives, but an open mind simply sees more of it.  I have the confidence now to use serendipity as a powerful defacto indicator that my mind is more open, and therefore probably more receptive to opportunity and creativity.  Make sense?  Watch out for it and tell me what you think.  Does it happen to you also?  I’m very keen to know more. 

A nice piece of historical serendipity to share

By happy coincidence, while researching my speech, I discovered a little bit more about an ancestor Laura Jane Suisted (1840 - 1903), and an unexpectedly fascinating link between us that spans the globe, and a century, appeared…… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >