Runner up, Photographer of the Year 2014 awards

November 4th, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Following on from the Major book award by our Molesworth Station Book, I’m very proud to say that Molesworth Station images taken while filming the Book have just won runner up in the NZ Geographic Magazine, NZ Photographer of the Year awards. molesworth_pix_wpoty2014

For a look at a large selection of Molesworth Station photos, go here. If you’re interested in purchasing any of these images on high quality canvas art prints, then check this out.

I’d like to thank New Zealand Geographic Magazine for running this great award, and to their sponsors for supporting it.

Molesworth Station Book a winner! NZ Post Book Awards

August 29th, 2014 § 4 comments - add yours

Very happy!  Harry Broad and my book ‘Molesworth – Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station’ has won the Booksellers Choice award at the prestiguous national NZ Post book awards.

Molesworth Book wins prestiguous award at NZ Post Book Awards 2014

Molesworth Book wins prestigous award, NZ Post Book Awards 2014 (photo: Mark Tantrum)

On stage to accept the award (on behalf of Harry Broad too), it struck me how wearing a suit and tie here was about as far away from a horseback on the Kaikoura Ranges in sleet and snow mustering cattle with the young stockmen; an irony that felt good.


I’d like to thank Nielsen Book Services and New Zealand Post for their support of the  award.  Department of Conservation and Landcorp for supporting the work Harry and I did.  Jim and Tracey Ward, as managers of Molesworth, they gave us tremendous access and freedom to the Station – I’m sure letting a couple of ‘North Island townies’ loose on the property was a punt, so thank you. Also, the young stockmen that I worked alongside were great company and willing helpers to make things work – especially helping to coax a greenhorn horse rider into a horse rider of sorts – thank you. Robbie Burton worked passionately to make Molesworth a title to be proud of.  Thank you Robbie, to you and your team at Craig Potton Publishing, I’ll be forever grateful for your work.

Thanks to readers and buyers.  We’ve sold a tremendous number of books – in fact reprinting 3 times in a month, and that’s remarkable for New Zealand.  Your support is fantastic and humbling. Clearly Molesworth connects deeply to the Kiwi pysche – and long may it I say.

Lastly, I’ve saved special thanks to all the booksellers that have stocked and supported our book. You are the ones that work at the interface with book buyers, and truly understand books and what people want. As a colleague in the industry said:

“What a marvellous achievement, congratulations!  The Booksellers Choice Award is the best one to win as it is a reflection of consumer awareness, from the people who buy and sell books, not just the view of the judges for any one year.”

That is why the award means so much to me.

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (winner of the 2013 Man Booker prize) was in our category, so it was a tremendous surprise to win, and underlines what a tremendous job Robbie Burton (above right) and his team at Craig Potton Publishing did to create Harry’s and my work into something of weight and substance.  That’s some competition to weather!

Of course, Eleanor was very gracious in defeat by Molesworth I should add.  She has had a tremendous year, and collected awards on the night too.  It was great to spend time celebrating with her – clearly she has been able to keep her feet on the ground despite her incredible win on the world stage.

Eleanor Catton, Elise Grange, Rob Suisted

Eleanor Catton, Elise Grange, Rob Suisted

If you’d like to experience more of Molesworth, then have a go with these:

Behind the scenes youtube during book filming. Caution, it may or may not contain footage of young stockmen swimming in freezing alpine tarns!

Story and images from the tough Robinson Saddle Muster

My Molesworth Station photos

Quality Molesworth Book images for sale

Buy the book from


A Very Good Week – Finalist in 2 National Awards

August 11th, 2014 § 1 comment - add yours

Finalist in the New Zealand Post Book Awards, AND Finalist in the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year Awards in the same week. Very proud about that. Please give us a vote in the Public choice awards
NZ Post Book Awards UPDATE: We WON! Have a lookNew Zealand Awards Finalist Rob Suisted

Thank you.

Molesworth Station Book launch

September 10th, 2013 § 2 comments - add yours

After a 3 year gestation, our Molesworth Station Book is done – one of the most satisfying book projects so far.

Molesworth Station Book cover

Harry Broad is the author, and I’ve produced the photos. It’s been an incredible adventure.

Here’s an interesting behind the scenes video I shot while filming the unique Robinson Saddle muster (caution; it contains hardwork, a greenhorn learning to ride, some skinny dipping, some adventure, and a few laughs. But, mostly it contains spectacular scenery and a rare glimpse into a unique high-country lifestyle and job):

The full story of this Robinson Muster is also written up with some photos.

Check out some Rob’s favourite Molesworth Station images collected over 3 years.

Special thanks to Landcorp Farming Ltd, Department of Conservation, the managers of Molesworth (Jim and Tracey Ward), Craig Potton Publishing, everyone who has featured in the book, and especially the many people who worked hard for us to make the project successful.  Thank you.

Radio New Zealand NationalJust had an enjoyable Radio New Zealand interview with Harry Broad and Kathryn Ryan. You can listen here to Harry share some wonderful stories he’s uncovered through his research (I never get sick Harry’s colourful telling), and I attempt using words to explain my visual portrayal of the Station and experiences.

Books are expected in book shops from the 16th September 2013. Find it on the Craig Potton Publishing Website: Molesworth; Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station. Harry Broad with photographs by Rob Suisted. Craig Potton Publishing, Hardback with jacket, 250 x 310 mm, 192 pages, plus map insert. ISBN 9781877517167. September 2013.

We’ve put together a special collection of 68 high quality canvas photo art prints, for home or the office, from the Molesworth Station book here:
Molesworth Station canvas photo art prints

Molesworth Station Book Cover Unveiled

June 24th, 2013 § 2 comments - add yours

MOLESWORTH STATION, stories from New Zealand’s largest high country station, has been a 2 1/2 year journey with author Harry Broad, attempting to create a book that does Molesworth Station justice.  At 500,000 acres the station is bigger than Stewart Island, and contains one of NZ’s biggest cattle herds.  Here’s the first glimpse of the cover of the book, due for September release.
Molesworth Station Book cover

The name of Molesworth has huge national recognition, not only because it is our largest high-country station, but also because of the remarkable story of how, from the early 1940s, the legendary manager Bill Chisholm rebuilt a ruined landscape and turned it into a flourishing and profitable farm. Molesworth covers an area greater than Stewart Island, and is in every sense a working farm, home to one of the country’s largest cattle herds… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Molesworth Muster video finished. Behind the scenes photo assignment

June 14th, 2012 § 15 comments - add yours

Filming the Molesworth Station Book video. A blog post explaining the adventure is here. Have a read, then watch this (Caution: it contains hard work, adventure, some skinny dipping, some excitement, a lost dog that gets found in the end, and a great watch):

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

> > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Molesworth Station Muster – A unique photo assignment adventure!

June 11th, 2012 § 28 comments - add yours

“You should come on the May autumn muster to Lake McRae.” said Jim Ward, Manager of Molesworth high country Station.

What an invitation; for those that know Molesworth Station you’ll understand the significance of such an invite! For those that know Lake McRae (see map at bottom), many will regard this as a holy land of sorts. To join in on the annual cattle muster to push 400 cattle over the Inland Kaikoura Ranges to their traditional winter pastures is epic. Not only is it regarded as one of the highest cattle musters in the world (at over 1400m/4700ft), but it’s also one of the most remote seldom visited spots in New Zealand. With three stockmen & horses involved, and small backcountry hut, it’s also a very few lucky folks that have ever participated in this 100 year tradition. More folks have climbed Everest than been here. This is not a commercial trip, but a unique rare opportunity to join the stockmen on part of their annual work programme in the high country.

“Would love to Jim, thanks” was my response, adding “I’m a bit of a green horn on a horse though. “Don’t worry, there are horses that don’t like people too” Jim shot back as I was leaving. I just hope I’m not given one of those horses I thought. This is the story of the amazing adventure, including learning to ride, that followed (youtube video of trip now available, so have a read of this & then click here to view the short vid to get a real feeling for the place)…

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

For the last 18 months I’ve been working on a book about this historic high country station with Harry Broad. Lance McCaskill wrote a seminal book about the first 50 years of Molesworth history. We’re bringing the history of this fascinating iconic high country run up to date. It’s New Zealand’s largest farm at 500,000 acres and sits nestled amongst mountain ranges between Blenheim, Hanmer Springs and Kaikoura.

Back at my office in Wellington, Nina, my Business Manager, was excited. She’d grown up with horses and rode professionally back in Sweden. On weekends she trains riders and horses. You will be fine, I’ll teach you she said.

My horse riding crash course on Red. Photo & teaching by Nina Tötterman

Learning: my horse riding crash course on Red. Photo & teaching by Nina Tötterman

So started a wonderful bi weekly programme designed to advance me from newbie to competent horse rider in less than a month, but most importantly to toughen up my softer spots. Each Tuesday and Thursday we shut the office at noon, headed for Wainuiomata and climbed on horses. My third lesson as cantering bareback. They pushed me hard to learn on the crash course but I’m very grateful now. Luckily I apparently picked things up fast, learning I think more about animal behaviour and psychology than staying on Red, Ray, or Teddy, the three boys I learnt to ride on. Bruce and Kelly’s property in Wainuiomata had a great variety of steep hills and trails to explore between flat work. Things started to arch and hurt in places you’d normally only see with a mirror; apparently a sign you’re doing it right. Weird that.

Nina, my Bus. Mgr & horse whisperer controlling an over excited high performance F1 hot blooded 'Shaka'

Nina, my Bus. Mgr & horse whisperer controlling an over excited high performance F1 hot blooded 'Shaka'

One Sunday night the phone went; it’s Jim. “Can you get down tomorrow? We’re bringing it forward due to weather”. I hurriedly finished my GST tax return, a quick pack and assemblage of equipment and I was on the ferry heading for the South Island.

I arrived late evening, got a bit of gear organised, hit the hay around midnight, to be up a 4.30am for breakfast with Jim & Tracey and the three stockmen that I’d be riding with for the next 3 days, Andy McLachlan, Cory Hollister and Tom O’Sullivan. Nine months before I’d met these guys on their first week on Station as they learnt horse shoeing from visiting farriers so they could look after their horses in the remote out stations through the year (a skill we’d rely on later…

> > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Seasons revolving. Contrasts of Molesworth Station

September 15th, 2011 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

I’ve been photographing a book about Molesworth Station; New Zealand’s largest station at 200,000 hectares (500,000 acres!).

 The dramatic changes in landscapes, colours and seasons are imperceptible to our human time scale.  I’ve just compared 3 photos taken 5 months apart and watched the richness of colour fade out to a stark reality of a barren winter landscape.  Beautiful.

Molesworth Station seasonal contrast. Click to enlarge

Molesworth Station seasonal contrast. Click to enlarge

So, merged, the top two look great:

Awatere River at the Muller - lush autumn to stark winter


Looking forward to the spring colour flush…

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