Very proud to have photos on all our bank notes!

November 20th, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

The Reserve Bank announced new designs for the New Zealand bank notes today.

I’ve been keeping a big secret for months - my photographs appear on all of them.  I’m very proud about it, as you can imagine, to have you carrying my work in your wallets and purses.  Click on the image for a closer look:

New Zealand bank notes redesigned from Rob Suisted photos

New Zealand bank notes redesigned from Rob Suisted photos

Runner up, Photographer of the Year 2014 awards

November 4th, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Following on from the Major book award by our Molesworth Station Book, I’m very proud to say that Molesworth Station images taken while filming the Book have just won runner up in the NZ Geographic Magazine, NZ Photographer of the Year awards. molesworth_pix_wpoty2014

For a look at a large selection of Molesworth Station photos, go here. If you’re interested in purchasing any of these images on high quality canvas art prints, then check this out.

I’d like to thank New Zealand Geographic Magazine for running this great award, and to their sponsors for supporting it.

2015 Calendars already

September 17th, 2014 § 1 comment - add yours

First of our 2015 calendar creations have arrived.  Here are 13 different titles we’ve done with John Sands New Zealand - part of a 17 year relationship we’ve had creating quality New Zealand calendars together. robsuisted-calendars-for-2015-john-sands_w You’ll find them in most book shops, post offices, supermarkets throughout New Zealand.   We never get tired of seeing them together, hot off the press.

Hospital ward designed with patient care in mind. The power of pure NZ imagery

September 15th, 2014 § 1 comment - add yours

Auckland City Hospital’s Motutapu Ward, the new Northern Region Haematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, is using over 20 of our large murals.

The stunning facility has been co-designed with patients and has a range of unique features which have set a new standard in patient centred care. Former leukaemia patient and fundraising ambassador, Molly Rowlandson, says the new ward has exceeded all her expectations. ADHB press release

Rob Suisted murals in Auckland Hospital Haemotology and Bone Marrow transplant ward, ADHB

Relaxing NZ flax wetland reflections ©Rob Suisted - www.naturespic.com

More research is showing that quality images of nature are important to our well being, and important in our lives. We enjoyed working with Klein (Architects of Specialised Environments) to get the best images - not only in subject, but in size and proportions to get the best quality reproduction.

Rob Suisted murals in Auckland Hospital Haemotology and Bone Marrow transplant ward, ADHB

Coromandel sunset ©Rob Suisted - www.naturespic.com

There are three aspects for quality large reproductions: 1) Orignal image size before interpolation - i.e. the more pixels from the camera the better!, 2) reproduction size, how big is your mural going to be, and 3) viewing distance - how far is the view from the print? Viewing distance is often much neglected in consideration. E.g. a phone photo will work for a billboard size reproduction if the viewing distance is 100 metres away, but on a wall at a close viewing distance it will fail badily. If the print is viewed from a few metres then there is no substitute for professional files

Rob Suisted mural in Auckland Hospital ADHB 1

Clarence River high country ©Rob Suisted - www.naturespic.com

We work really hard to provide image files that can go large, with close viewing distances. In fact, we’ve just invested in the new Pentax 645Z camera and full set of lenses, a camera of 51 megapixels per image. Professionally stitched image panoramas will make amongst the best image files for murals available anywhere.

Several other large mural projects we’re been involved with here.

2 new books released this week

September 4th, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

We’ve added 2 new titles to a successful seven book series with New Holland Publishers.  The series has been well supported by book sellers and educational institutions and have been great fun to produce.

high-country-and-historic-books-by-rob-suistedEarly reviews are looking good so they should be great additions, given that the other books have already had multiple reprints.  Dr Sven Schroeder wrote text for Historic Places of New Zealand book, and Alison Dench took care of the High Country in New Zealand title. Thank you to both of you, and to New Holland for creating the great new additions. Find them in all local bookshops.

Molesworth Station Book a winner! NZ Post Book Awards

August 29th, 2014 § 4 comments - add yours

Very happy!  Harry Broad and my book ‘Molesworth - Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station’ has won the Booksellers Choice award at the prestiguous national NZ Post book awards.

Molesworth Book wins prestiguous award at NZ Post Book Awards 2014

Molesworth Book wins prestigous award, NZ Post Book Awards 2014 (photo: Mark Tantrum)

On stage to accept the award (on behalf of Harry Broad too), it struck me how wearing a suit and tie here was about as far away from a horseback on the Kaikoura Ranges in sleet and snow mustering cattle with the young stockmen; an irony that felt good.

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I’d like to thank Nielsen Book Services and New Zealand Post for their support of the  award.  Department of Conservation and Landcorp for supporting the work Harry and I did.  Jim and Tracey Ward, as managers of Molesworth, they gave us tremendous access and freedom to the Station - I’m sure letting a couple of ‘North Island townies’ loose on the property was a punt, so thank you. Also, the young stockmen that I worked alongside were great company and willing helpers to make things work - especially helping to coax a greenhorn horse rider into a horse rider of sorts - thank you. Robbie Burton worked passionately to make Molesworth a title to be proud of.  Thank you Robbie, to you and your team at Craig Potton Publishing, I’ll be forever grateful for your work.

Thanks to readers and buyers.  We’ve sold a tremendous number of books - in fact reprinting 3 times in a month, and that’s remarkable for New Zealand.  Your support is fantastic and humbling. Clearly Molesworth connects deeply to the Kiwi pysche - and long may it I say.

Lastly, I’ve saved special thanks to all the booksellers that have stocked and supported our book. You are the ones that work at the interface with book buyers, and truly understand books and what people want. As a colleague in the industry said:

“What a marvellous achievement, congratulations!  The Booksellers Choice Award is the best one to win as it is a reflection of consumer awareness, from the people who buy and sell books, not just the view of the judges for any one year.”

That is why the award means so much to me.

The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (winner of the 2013 Man Booker prize) was in our category, so it was a tremendous surprise to win, and underlines what a tremendous job Robbie Burton (above right) and his team at Craig Potton Publishing did to create Harry’s and my work into something of weight and substance.  That’s some competition to weather!

Of course, Eleanor was very gracious in defeat by Molesworth I should add.  She has had a tremendous year, and collected awards on the night too.  It was great to spend time celebrating with her - clearly she has been able to keep her feet on the ground despite her incredible win on the world stage.

Eleanor Catton, Elise Grange, Rob Suisted

Eleanor Catton, Elise Grange, Rob Suisted

If you’d like to experience more of Molesworth, then have a go with these:

- Behind the scenes youtube during book filming. Caution, it may or may not contain footage of young stockmen swimming in freezing alpine tarns!

- Story and images from the tough Robinson Saddle Muster

- My Molesworth Station photos

- Quality Molesworth Book images for sale

- Buy the book from cpp.co.nz

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Nikon Monarch ATB Binocular Broken Eye Cup Replacement

August 15th, 2014 § 3 comments - add yours

Nikon make a tremendous set of binoculars in the Monarch ATB series.  I was drawn to this model after Cornell Lab reviews that consistently place these binos in the same league as models many times their price.

I work and photograph in some pretty hostile environments - from the Arctic to the Antarctic, to remote parts of the New Zealand wilderness, and deliberately chose the lower priced model thinking I could wreck or lose several binoculars for the price of one Leica, Zeiss or Swaroski.

High Arctic Nanavut, NZ Sub Antarctic Islands, Antarctica - the Nikon Monarch's have had a good life so far

High Arctic Nanavut, NZ Sub Antarctic Islands, Antarctica - the Nikon Monarch's have had a good life so far

But alas, after a few years they’re still going strong after hardy service in salty coastal areas, mountains and near the Poles. But for one weakness, a broken eye cup ring (a common problem I believe because of the very thin plastic design and normal wear and tear) they have been excellent.

The thin plastic ring holding the eyecups eventually fails on Nikon Monarch Binos. A known weakness but easiy fixed though

The thin plastic ring holding the eyecups eventually fails on Nikon Monarch Binos. A known weakness but easiy fixed though

I was initially drawn to Don Enright’s post about replacing the eyecups and would have used his post to make repairs, but have found there are… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

A Very Good Week - Finalist in 2 National Awards

August 11th, 2014 § 1 comment - add yours

Finalist in the New Zealand Post Book Awards, AND Finalist in the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year Awards in the same week. Very proud about that. Please give us a vote in the Public choice awards
NZ Post Book Awards UPDATE: We WON! Have a lookNew Zealand Awards Finalist Rob Suisted

Thank you.

Shooting a Clean River Advocate. A Tough Assignment.

July 28th, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

New Zealand Geographic Magazine had me do another editorial portrait; Bryce Johnson was the subject of their regular feature ‘Profile’.

My job was to communicate Bryce’s varied roles in one image.  This was a formidable task as CEO of the NZ Fish and Game Council his is a complex and varied role.  Primarily, Fish and Game is a statutory organisation concerned with the rights of anglers and hunters, and advocating for improving habitat.

The portrait needed to capture that variety. I wanted to focus on his advocacy for anglers and freshwater quality for all of us, but also how his day can stretch from political halls of the The Beehive, to the bank of a river.  Here’s what I got:

Bryce Johnson portrait, NZ Fish and Game Council

The shot was fairly complex, it required a wide angle underwater photo to catch the habitat around Bryce and called for a balanced mix of underwater strobe, above water flash and ambient natural light.  I used a slave trigger that fired the topside flash whenever the underwater camera strobe fired - one underwater strobe lighting Bryce’s legs, one flash pointing upward towards the softbox flash, and natural light toned down to give a sombre background to delineate Bryce from.

Behind the scenes of Bryce Johnson portrait for NZ Geographic Magazine

The biggest problems we had were a suitable… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

NZ Post Book Awards 2014 Finalists - Molesworth Station Book in!

July 23rd, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

We’re excited to say our Molesworth Station Book (created with author Harry Broad), has been selected as a finalist in the New Zealand Book Awards for 2014.

Molesworth Station Book cover

NZ Book awards finalist - Molesworth Station Book

Please cross your fingers for us, we’re up against tough and worthy competition. The public can vote, and we hope you chose to vote for Molesworth (vote here now).

If you’re interested you can view behind the scenes story and video of photographing the Molesworth Station Book.

New Zealand Nothofagus beech forest no more

January 23rd, 2014 § 2 comments - add yours

Our New Zealand Nothofagus beech trees have vanished! Just before Xmas been, a major taxonomic revision of Southern Beech Trees quietly occured that sees Nothofagus vanish from our shores, to be replaced by Fuscospora and Lophozonia. Nothofagus is no more in New Zealand.

New Zealand Beech Tree leaf comparison, by Rob Suisted

New Zealand Beech Tree leaf side by side comparison, Red, Hard, Silver, Black & Mountain Beech

Red Beech was Nothofagus fusca, now: Fuscospora fusca, Hard Beech was Nothofagus truncata, now: Fuscospora truncata, Silver Beech was Nothofagus menzeseii, now: Lophozonia menziesii,  Black Beech was Nothofagus solandri var. solandri, now: Fuscospora solandri, Mountain Beech was Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortioides, now: Fuscospora cliffortioides.  It’s going to take a bit to get the new names rolling from the tongue.

While we’re on the subject of our beautiful Southern Beeches, I took a photo that shows just how colourful these trees get.  This was taken near the top of the 4×4 Porika Road track in Nelson Lakes National Park and shows both new growth leaf colour and beech mast flowering:

Colourful New Zealand Red and Silver Beech Tree forest

Colourful New Zealand Red and Silver Beech Tree forest

Of interest is that this year is a ‘Mast’ year for our beech forest.

Black Beech tree flowers

Black Beech tree flowers

Masting is a breeding strategy that sees a species breed only once every few years, and then all individuals breed in unison, when conditions are favourable.  Our beech forests are into it now.

The forest will soon have an abundance of food for seed eaters, but this has a major unfortunate side effect… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

New photo murals just in

January 13th, 2014 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

We’ve been working with Kai Hawkins on some interesting projects lately.  Firstly we completed the new Blenheim i-SITE visitor centre, and today we got photos of new bus shelters we’ve supplied some luscious large high quality images for great looking murals.  Take a look:Marlborough Sounds

Molesworth Station

Marlborough Bus Shelter murals

Check out some of the other 2500 Marlborough images we have available online.

New Zealand postage stamps by Rob Suisted

September 26th, 2013 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Rob’s proudly done 18 postage stamps now with New Zealand Post.  Here are the latest three:

stamps-by-rob-suisted_tNew Zealand Post page.

Wildlife of New Zealand book, by Rob Suisted

September 18th, 2013 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Wildlife of New Zealand is the fifth book by Rob Suisted in a series with New Holland Publishers NZ that has just been released and should be in good book shops around NZ.

wildlife-of-new-zealand-book-_t
Wildlife of New Zealand, by Rob Suisted. 80 pages, soft cover, Sept 2013. New Holland Publishers New Zealand. ISBN: 978 1 86966 400 8

Molesworth Station Book launch

September 10th, 2013 § 2 comments - add yours

After a 3 year gestation, our Molesworth Station Book is done - one of the most satisfying book projects so far.

Molesworth Station Book cover

Harry Broad is the author, and I’ve produced the photos. It’s been an incredible adventure.

Here’s an interesting behind the scenes video I shot while filming the unique Robinson Saddle muster (caution; it contains hardwork, a greenhorn learning to ride, some skinny dipping, some adventure, and a few laughs. But, mostly it contains spectacular scenery and a rare glimpse into a unique high-country lifestyle and job):

The full story of this Robinson Muster is also written up with some photos.

Check out some Rob’s favourite Molesworth Station images collected over 3 years.

Special thanks to Landcorp Farming Ltd, Department of Conservation, the managers of Molesworth (Jim and Tracey Ward), Craig Potton Publishing, everyone who has featured in the book, and especially the many people who worked hard for us to make the project successful.  Thank you.

Radio New Zealand NationalJust had an enjoyable Radio New Zealand interview with Harry Broad and Kathryn Ryan. You can listen here to Harry share some wonderful stories he’s uncovered through his research (I never get sick Harry’s colourful telling), and I attempt using words to explain my visual portrayal of the Station and experiences.

Books are expected in book shops from the 16th September 2013. Find it on the Craig Potton Publishing Website: Molesworth; Stories from New Zealand’s largest high-country station. Harry Broad with photographs by Rob Suisted. Craig Potton Publishing, Hardback with jacket, 250 x 310 mm, 192 pages, plus map insert. ISBN 9781877517167. September 2013.

We’ve put together a special collection of 68 high quality canvas photo art prints, for home or the office, from the Molesworth Station book here:
Molesworth Station canvas photo art prints

Why the new Bain murder evidence is unsafe, I’ll prove it

June 27th, 2013 § 10 comments - add yours

TV3’s 3rd Degree show last night said they have ‘new’ evidence proving Robin Bain was the murderer, from tiny marks on 20 year old photos. I’m a professional photographer, and once an A grade competitive target shooter (full bore and .22), so I took an interest in the ‘new’ photographic evidence.

I think what was portrayed was VERY UNSAFE and doesn’t offer a ’slam dunk’ to the case as claimed by some. I looked into it and can easily show the new evidence does not prove anything. I’ll show you why:

Original evidence. Note shadow direction, high contrast, sharpened image

Original evidence. Note shadow direction, high contrast, sharpened image

This was taken on film, printed to paper, scanned and presented here. It’s high contrast, has been through various reproductions already, was a crop of the original frame, and looks to have been sharpened to maximise it’s contents (this is a problem as I’ll explain).

I looked at my own hand and immediately saw I had two marks, which turned out to be exactly the same size as my .22 rimfire magazine. Hmm, interesting. I grabbed my iPhone and here is my quick shot taken on the couch during the programme:

my first snap with my phone on the couch watching the 'new' evidence

my first snap with my phone on the couch watching the 'new' evidence. Wow, I have two natural fold lines EXACTLY the same width of a .22 magazine too. Getting itneresting.

NOW I’m interested! How can it be so easy with a quick photo of someone else’s thumb (mine), get immediately into the ballpark of the new evidence? OK, let’s try with my Canon 1DsMk3 and 24-70 lens, and try to roughly copy the lighting (note the shadow direction - it will give very good relief to any folds or imperfections on Robin Bain’s skin from that side angle). Here’s the first go (quite difficult with camera angles and only 2 hands):

Raw file as shot

Raw file as shot

I then had a go at upping contrast,…

(null)

Molesworth Station Book Cover Unveiled

June 24th, 2013 § 2 comments - add yours

MOLESWORTH STATION, stories from New Zealand’s largest high country station, has been a 2 1/2 year journey with author Harry Broad, attempting to create a book that does Molesworth Station justice.  At 500,000 acres the station is bigger than Stewart Island, and contains one of NZ’s biggest cattle herds.  Here’s the first glimpse of the cover of the book, due for September release.
Molesworth Station Book cover

The name of Molesworth has huge national recognition, not only because it is our largest high-country station, but also because of the remarkable story of how, from the early 1940s, the legendary manager Bill Chisholm rebuilt a ruined landscape and turned it into a flourishing and profitable farm. Molesworth covers an area greater than Stewart Island, and is in every sense a working farm, home to one of the country’s largest cattle herds… > > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Blenheim gets a new Information Centre - using our photos

May 24th, 2013 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

I supplied many images to outfit the Blenheim Information Centre, and recently got the chance to view the final result.

blenheim-visitors-centre-0006_w

It’s always great to work on a project that uses images that make you proud, and this is one of them.

blenheim-visitors-centre-0004_w

Pop in if you’re passing through Blenheim - it’s a great building with nice interior and exterior design.

blenheim-visitors-centre-0002_w

Images were from my wide Marlborough District collection.  We do a lot of large image installations and murals like this. For example, you’ll see my images used in Auckland and Christchurch International Airports.

New Zealand native geckos

March 14th, 2013 § 4 comments - add yours

A few frames from a recent photoshoot of one of our rare native geckos - this one is a Lewis Pass Green Gecko (Naultinus tuberculatus); a real cutie licking his eyeball

Lewis Pass Green Gecko (Naultinus tuberculatus)

Lewis Pass Green Gecko (Naultinus tuberculatus)

I’ve been fortunate enough to photograph many of our New Zealand lizards, have a browse.

New books and an enjoyable radio interview

October 2nd, 2012 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Just had my 10th and 11th books hit the book shops; very satisfying to see them arrive.flowers-landmarks-of-nz_t

Thoroughly enjoyed a RadioLive interview with Graeme Hill.  Have a listen here for why Triffids were mentioned in the interview about NZ flowers, why NZ flowers are mostly white in colour, and the parasitic native orchid that gets its life from sucking it out of other plants:

CLICK to listen to interview with Rob Suisted

CLICK to listen to interview with Rob Suisted

Some other promotion included: The Press Christchurch Oct-1-2012, Stuff Website, Yahoo, GardensNZ, MindFood Magazine

Molesworth Muster video finished. Behind the scenes photo assignment

June 14th, 2012 § 13 comments - add yours

Filming the Molesworth Station Book video. A blog post explaining the adventure is here. Have a read, then watch this (Caution: it contains hard work, adventure, some skinny dipping, some excitement, a lost dog that gets found in the end, and a great watch):

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

> > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Molesworth Station Muster - A unique photo assignment adventure!

June 11th, 2012 § 27 comments - add yours

“You should come on the May autumn muster to Lake McRae.” said Jim Ward, Manager of Molesworth high country Station.

What an invitation; for those that know Molesworth Station you’ll understand the significance of such an invite! For those that know Lake McRae (see map at bottom), many will regard this as a holy land of sorts. To join in on the annual cattle muster to push 400 cattle over the Inland Kaikoura Ranges to their traditional winter pastures is epic. Not only is it regarded as one of the highest cattle musters in the world (at over 1400m/4700ft), but it’s also one of the most remote seldom visited spots in New Zealand. With three stockmen & horses involved, and small backcountry hut, it’s also a very few lucky folks that have ever participated in this 100 year tradition. More folks have climbed Everest than been here. This is not a commercial trip, but a unique rare opportunity to join the stockmen on part of their annual work programme in the high country.

“Would love to Jim, thanks” was my response, adding “I’m a bit of a green horn on a horse though. “Don’t worry, there are horses that don’t like people too” Jim shot back as I was leaving. I just hope I’m not given one of those horses I thought. This is the story of the amazing adventure, including learning to ride, that followed (youtube video of trip now available, so have a read of this & then click here to view the short vid to get a real feeling for the place)…

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

Molesworth Station Muster team on Robinson Saddle

For the last 18 months I’ve been working on a book about this historic high country station with Harry Broad. Lance McCaskill wrote a seminal book about the first 50 years of Molesworth history. We’re bringing the history of this fascinating iconic high country run up to date. It’s New Zealand’s largest farm at 500,000 acres and sits nestled amongst mountain ranges between Blenheim, Hanmer Springs and Kaikoura.

Back at my office in Wellington, Nina, my Business Manager, was excited. She’d grown up with horses and rode professionally back in Sweden. On weekends she trains riders and horses. You will be fine, I’ll teach you she said.

My horse riding crash course on Red. Photo & teaching by Nina Tötterman

Learning: my horse riding crash course on Red. Photo & teaching by Nina Tötterman

So started a wonderful bi weekly programme designed to advance me from newbie to competent horse rider in less than a month, but most importantly to toughen up my softer spots. Each Tuesday and Thursday we shut the office at noon, headed for Wainuiomata and climbed on horses. My third lesson as cantering bareback. They pushed me hard to learn on the crash course but I’m very grateful now. Luckily I apparently picked things up fast, learning I think more about animal behaviour and psychology than staying on Red, Ray, or Teddy, the three boys I learnt to ride on. Bruce and Kelly’s property in Wainuiomata had a great variety of steep hills and trails to explore between flat work. Things started to arch and hurt in places you’d normally only see with a mirror; apparently a sign you’re doing it right. Weird that.

Nina, my Bus. Mgr & horse whisperer controlling an over excited high performance F1 hot blooded 'Shaka'

Nina, my Bus. Mgr & horse whisperer controlling an over excited high performance F1 hot blooded 'Shaka'

One Sunday night the phone went; it’s Jim. “Can you get down tomorrow? We’re bringing it forward due to weather”. I hurriedly finished my GST tax return, a quick pack and assemblage of equipment and I was on the ferry heading for the South Island.

I arrived late evening, got a bit of gear organised, hit the hay around midnight, to be up a 4.30am for breakfast with Jim & Tracey and the three stockmen that I’d be riding with for the next 3 days, Andy McLachlan, Cory Hollister and Tom O’Sullivan. Nine months before I’d met these guys on their first week on Station as they learnt horse shoeing from visiting farriers so they could look after their horses in the remote out stations through the year (a skill we’d rely on later…

> > > Continue reading : full post + comments > > >

Flying high image

April 23rd, 2012 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Nice to be involved with the Department of Conservation / Air New Zealand joint venture partnership announcement.

Had one of my photos used as a giant backdrop to the Prime Minister of New Zealand’s announcement speech Friday night.  A large mid air panorama photo (big enough to be printed 7m x 3m) taken hanging out the door at 5000ft. For health and safety reasons the sexy black AirNZ plane filled with very rare bird and animals was added later…(yes, that’s a Kiwi in the cockpit).  Here’s the media for it on Stuff.

7m x 3m wide banner used as background to Prime Minister's announcement of the new relationship

7m x 3m wide banner used as background to Prime Minister's announcement of the new relationship

More stunning Milford Sound, New Zealand images here if you’re after a bit of eye candy from an amazing place - just a tonic if you’re at your desk we think.

FLYING GREEN: Prime Minister John Key and Air New Zealand boss Rob Fyfe have confirmed a three-year commercial partnership between the national carrier and the Department of Conservation. Photo by HAMISH COLEMAN-ROSS/Fairfax NZ

FLYING GREEN: Prime Minister John Key and Air New Zealand boss Rob Fyfe have confirmed a three-year commercial partnership between the national carrier and the Department of Conservation. Photo by HAMISH COLEMAN-ROSS/Fairfax NZ

Another newspaper interview

January 13th, 2012 § 0 comments, Add the 1st

Interviewed by the Hutt News:

Click to read the interview with photographer Rob Suisted
Click to read the interview with photographer Rob Suisted

The Monk photo mentioned is here, and some Molesworth Station work here.

A photo compliment committed to skin!

December 16th, 2011 § 4 comments - add yours

Some things stand out in my working photographic career; but having a photo tattooed onto skin, as a living memorial, has to be a remarkable compliment.

NZ Falcon photo tattoo

Nick Johns contacted me for permission to use a photo as a memorial to his brother.  Some things cross boundaries, and this does for me - creating an image someone feels is good enough to permanently etch onto their body in honour of someone they have lost, is very humbling. New Zealand falcon photograph

Nick wanted to tell everyone that his brother died as a consequence of drug addiction. ” We are all addicted to something in this life.  But the trouble with drugs for the addict is they progress, as Tim did from the so called harmless drugs, Marijuana etc to eventually the hard drugs, in Tim’s case Methamphetamine.  The only good thing to come out of this, is it has shown the next generation in our families how drugs will destroy lives. It destroyed their awesome Uncle Tim whom they all loved so very much.”

Thank you Nick for wanting to share this, and for creating a very humbling experience for me, from what is a very sad experience and loss for you.  We’d both love to hear your comments if you’d like to post any here.

You can learn more about how the image was originally captured for the cover of NZ Geographic Magazine, and how it was also used by a church with a great sense of humour.  There are more photos of this remarkable species, the New Zealand Falcon, here, and we’ve created a special quality canvas print.  Further, we selected it to be used as preface to Majestic New Zealand book because it’s a special shot that captures the essence of a remarkable but endangered creature.